Chemical Peel

A chemical peel or facial peel is a nonsurgical technique used to smooth some of the fine facial wrinkles associated with aging. Areas of sun-damaged skin and certain skin discolorations also respond to the procedure.

An acid solution is applied to the face, causing the top layer of skin to peel, revealing new, fresh layers of skin. Chemical peels affect superficial, medium, or deep layers of skin depending on the strength of the acid, the duration of contact, and skin type. Deeper peels increase the risk of scarring.

Creams are often prescribed to prepare the skin several weeks before the procedure. The acid can produce a burning and tightening sensation, but most people do not require anesthesia.

With superficial peels, skin will appear pink or red following the procedure. Mild facial swelling may develop, especially around the eyes and on the chin. Some areas of skin may become crusty or scaly.

Medium depth peels cause more intense swelling. The skin is initially white, becoming increasingly red for the first 24 to 48 hours. The skin then peels as if severely sunburned. Peeling lasts from four to eight days. Skin may appear pink for several weeks.

While bandages are not necessary, a thin layer of prescribed ointment keeps the skin clean and moist after a chemical peel. Patients who are taking Accutane can have problems with scarring following peels.


Ectropion

Ectropion is an outward turning of the lower eyelid, most commonly caused by aging, although eyelid burns or skin disease may also be responsible.

Normally, the eyelids help lubricate and cleanse the eye during blinking. An eyelid that is drooping and has lost contact with the eye can cause dry eyes, excessive tearing, redness and sensitivity to light and wind.

Surgery can be performed to tighten the eyelid and return it to its normal position. The eyelid can then protect and lubricate the eye properly, so that irritation and other symptoms subside.

Eyelid surgery to repair ectropion is usually performed as an outpatient procedure using local anesthesia. After surgery, an eye patch is usually worn and antibiotic ointment is prescribed.


Entropion

Entropion is an inward turning of the eyelid and lashes toward the eye, usually caused by relaxation of the eye muscles and tissue due to aging.

Entropion usually affects the lower lid. The skin and eyelashes rub against the eye and cause discomfort and tearing. The irritated eye can produce mucous, and become red and sensitive to light and wind. If entropion is not treated, rubbing of the skin and eyelashes can cause infection or scarring of the eye, which can cause vision loss.

Surgery can be performed to tighten the eyelid and return it to its normal position. The eyelid then protects the eye properly, and irritation and other symptoms subside.

Eyelid surgery to repair entropion is usually performed as an outpatient procedure using local anesthesia. After surgery, an eye patch is usually worn and antibiotic ointment is prescribed.